Social Media Tips & Blog

Create Visual Ideas for Book Marketing

Joel D Canfield booksReaders love visuals that capture their attention. Every social media platform uses images and some, like Instagram and Pinterest, revolve around the use of images. Facebook posts with images get two to three times the engagement that posts without visuals get. It's easy to create visuals. Just use your phone to take photos and then a free tool like Canva.com to create something that grabs your audience's attention. As an example, I created this Facebook post for my husband's fiction books with the aim of getting more newsletter subscribers.

Here are a few ideas for creating visuals for use in your social media book marketing.

  1. If you have written several books, line them up on a shelf or in a stack and take a photo of them to share. Even better, if you have some other marketing collateral, such as a bookmark or postcard, include that in the photo.
  2. Take a selfie with your book to share. If you're not comfortable with your own photo, just 'peek' from behind the book.
  3. Everyone loves animal photos. Get a photo of your cat or dog with your book nearby. Of if you don't own a pet, use a stuffed animal - teddy bears are always cute. :)
  4. Share quotes or tips from your book as a graphic.
  5. Take a photo of where you write with your book on the desk or a shelf.
  6. Ask readers to take photos of themselves with your book and then ask for their permission to share those photos on your platforms.

I'd love to hear from you other ways you've used visuals in book marketing. Please leave your comment below.

What Ausoma Means (Video)

Expanding Your Network 15 Minutes at a Time

This year Sue has been using an old-fashioned method to expand her social network. Because she's doing it right, it has not only delivered results but it's been fun.

Any time she comes across the social media profile of someone interesting (from a professional perspective) she spends a little time learning more about them, then invites them to have a 15-minute phone call to get to know each other. She calls them "Getting to Know Each Other" calls. (I'm the writer in the family but since she pays my bills I'll stay out of her business.)

Yes, that's right, it's the old "Can I buy you a cup of coffee?" ploy, ruined by professional networkers a decade ago.

Here's how Sue does it right:

  1. She spent the time to develop a reputation for sincerity and generosity.
  2. She takes the time to get to know something about the other person, even interacting at their blog or other social media accounts, before she raises the idea of chatting on the phone.
  3. When she approaches them, she expresses a specific interest in something they do or offer.
  4. Wait, before that, she actually feels a genuine interest in something they do or offer. That's the whole point: they're professionally interesting.
  5. She uses a simple free tool called Calendly to allow them to schedule their call anytime she's free and which is convenient for them. No phone tag or endless scheduling emails.
  6. During the conversation, she actually listens to them, treats them with dignity and respect, and only shares what Ausoma does as something that might support their business. No sales pitch. Ever. (Did we get that part? That's what killed the "cup of coffee" gag, remember?)
  7. She keeps in touch, and when she finds something of value to them she shares it.

The theme there is generosity. People can tell when you're "having a chat" but it's all about you.

They can also tell, from a mile away, when you're a sincere and generous person who believes that the more you help others, the better your own business and life are.

Focused Daily Monitoring for Social Media

I strongly encourage clients to spend 10-15 minutes each day to monitor their social media accounts. This can be challenging if you don't stay focused. It's so easy to get distracted by what's going on in social media and especially in your personal timeline on Facebook. Stay focused on your purpose to monitor your business accounts and be determined not to get sidetracked.

You can do it! I've timed myself more than once and I spend 10-15 minutes every morning doing this focused daily monitoring on my social media for business accounts. Later in the day I can spend time on my personal accounts.

My Daily Monitoring Routine

I did all this today in just under 9 minutes:

  • Log in to Instagram to check my business account
    1. Check notifications - new likes, comments, messages, new followers
    2. Respond to any comments, messages, new followers
    3. Review and like a few appropriate posts by others
  • Log in to LinkedIn
    1. Check notifications & messages
    2. Respond to any comments, messages, new network connections
    3. Review and like a few appropriate posts by others
  • Log in to Twitter
    1. Check notifications & messages
    2. Follow back as appropriate anyone new who has followed me
    3. Follow at least 5 new profiles
    4. Respond to any comments, messages
    5. Check my lists and like and retweet a few appropriate tweets by others
  • Log in to Facebook to check my business account
    1. Check notifications & messages
    2. Respond to any comments, messages, new connections
    3. Review and like a few appropriate posts by others

The process usually does only take me about 10 minutes each morning. Sometimes a bit longer if there are comments on articles I've posted or group discussions I'm participating in.

For each account, I check only my business accounts. I check my personal accounts later in the day.

I'm happy to answer any question you have about using social media if you'd like to leave it in the comments below. You can also schedule a consultation with me here.

Are You Following Everyone?

The more people you follow on social media, the more people follow you back, right?

Mathematically, it may be right.

From a marketing perspective, wrong.

Even if everyone you followed did follow you back, that doesn't mean they are the right people to follow.

A marketing expert on Twitter recently tweeted "don't make it a goal to appeal to everyone online." Great advice! It's more effective to appeal to those who are truly interested in your topic.

A couple hours later, though, they tweeted "follow random people . . . there's a chance they may follow you back . . . you may sell them something later".

I disagree. Don't just follow anybody hoping they'll follow back. Even if they do, they'll probably unfollow you when they realize your tweets aren't relevant to them after all.

And the goal of following people on social media should never be to "sell them something later". The goal is to Be Social and Get Noticed. If your followers get real value from your messages, they'll know how to find your book, product or services to buy.

That's why we are very selective about who we follow on our client's behalf. We look for people to follow who show an interest in our client's topics. We do this in two main ways:

  1. We review the bio/description to see if they have an interest in that topic.
  2. We review their tweets to see if they are tweeting about that topic and using related hashtags.

It's much better to have fewer, but relevant and engaged followers. We help our clients with engagement by:

  • Checking notifications to see who is engaging with and messaging a client, and responding as needed
  • Retweeting relevant content from Twitter lists we've helped create for a client
  • Sending thank you tweets to selected followers who retweet a client's tweets

Don't follow everyone, or just anyone - only those who want to follow you! Want to know how we can help with that? Just ask.